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20130228
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Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the governor's desk. -- gun-control legislation will land on the governor's desk. >> if the city does not make major cuts and reforms in 10 years, bankruptcy may be the only option, a report said. moallemthe mayor talked about tt report. >> the report put out by public financial management, and corporate takes a closer look at what the city's books will look like in 10 years. according to this report, the news is not good. >> if we act now, if we act decisively and boldly, we can change the trajectory for the city. >> the mayor on the defensive after a privately commissioned report indicated that if nothing is done to the city's budget, baltimore will be in financial ruin by fiscal year 2022. take a closer look at the numbers assuming a continuation of closer -- programs and policies conducted by the city on the carry forward basis. in 10 years the city will be $745 million in the whole. add to that an additional $1.30 billion for failing infrastructure as well as health-care and pension benefits for retirees and you are talking more than $2 billion in the hole. >> i believe this report is a w
, and schools closed in a number of cities. forecasters predicted new england would get the worst of it with up to three feet of snow likely in boston. mayor thomas menino. >> this is a storm of major proportions. stay off the roads. stay home. let the public works crews do their job. >> brown: the region also braced for winds reaching 75 miles an hour that will pile up drifts and almost guarantee widespread power outages. as ever, the threat prompted shoppers to pack stores, stocking up on supplies. >> this is panic shopping, so bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> you've got to plan ahead. a couple feet of snow would shut everything down and, who knows, it could be a couple of days, right? >> brown: in new york city, predictions called for as much as a foot of snow, and mayor michael bloomberg said the city had marshaled an army of plows and salt trucks. >> the sanitation department will deploy something like 1,700 snowplows and 65 front-end loaders. it also has 450 salt-spreaders already deployed. >> brown: the storm also focused new concern on the new york and new j
-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was de ssible b the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: millions of people in the northeast and new england battened down for a weekend blizzard today. forecasters warned it could be one for the record books. by this afternoon, the gathering storm was beginning to whiten the landscape for hundreds of miles, with long
've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building where about 250 people worked. the cause of the blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping down. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt and
for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this g
at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufacturers. in new york last week, the city school teachers pension fund sold off $13.5 million it held in stock with five gun makers. that followed action in california where the state teachers retirement system also stripped itself of $11.7 million of investments from three gun manufacturers. and the golden state's $254 billion public employees retirement system is also deciding whether to withdraw the $5 million worth of shares it holds in two companies. in chicago, mayor rahm emmanuel focused on banks, asking t.d. bank and bank of america to stop financing gun manufacturers. chicago's gun violence has placed it in the center of the national debate. michelle obama attended the funeral of hadiya pendleton who was shot to death near her school days after marching in the presidential inaugural parade and pendleton's parents joined mrs. obama as her guest at the state of the union speech last week. president obama returned to his hometown last week to
, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the american people decide it's important. if you decide it's important. if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, americans of every background stand up and say, "this time it's got to be different." >> ifill: the obama administration has been working to build on public outrage sparked by the mass shooting in newtown connecticut that left 20 children and six adults dead. ♪ for purple mountain majesty ♪ above... >> ifill: echos of that crime were still in the air last night at the super bowl where the sandy hook elementary school chorus sang "america the beautiful" before kick-off. and a super bowl ad paid for by mayors against illegal guns, a gun-control group, financed by new york mayor michael bloomberg, appealed for background checks for gun buyers. it featured a child
, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100
september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still presents with two people who have studied the epidemi
, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy and it fell at the wrong time. you know it started in the morning around rush hour and just continued until about 2:00 p.m. >> sreenivasan: the mayor said kansas city's main streets had been cleared by midday, and crews worked on residential neighborhoods. but yesterday, it was a far different story: this kansas city bus couldn't navigate the drifting snow and fishtailed into a lamp post. the snow came with high winds that piled up large drifts. and that, in turn, caused problems on the interstates. >> man, it's kind of tough out here even if you got a four wheel drive i advise you to stay in because everybody's getting stuck all over the place. it's a mess out here. >> sreenivasan: crews worked through the night and into today in missouri and kansas to plough i-70. 200 miles of the highway in kansas had been shut down as the storm blew through. today as the system tracked north and east, it created
. >> and the uncertainty is the city's hospitality industry, including cab drivers and hotel workers. if government flows and contractors stop traveling, i lose money, said one hotel doorman. of course i'm worried. bruce johnson, wusa9. >> the pentagon said almost 800,000 of its workers could lose up to 20% of their pay through those furloughs. >> as you just heard, the threat of government furloughs has federal workers on edge and that's why wusa9 started a petition. we are asking, should the congress face penalties if federal workers are furloughed due to sequestration? if you want to weigh in, here's what you do, you'll find the petition on our home page at wusa9.com. >>> ben bernanke is urging lawmakers to do something about these automatic budget cuts. bernanke warned that sequestration will slow down the sluggish u.s. economy even further. bernanke said despite some positive economic improvements, the job market is weak. >> lengthy periods of unemployment and under employment can erode skills and the labor force or prevent young people from gaining skills and experience in the first place. devel
of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build in better safeguards. at the same time, the board said investigators are still weeks away from determining what caused a battery fire on a japan airlines dreamliner in boston. in the meantime, all 50 of the planes in service, remain grounded. budget battle cries echoed up and down pennsylvania avenue in
traits come easily for students who have grown up in the city's roughest neighborhoods where they have already developed an inner strength remarkable for their age. >> often times those skill sets are not point pointed as assets. often times kids think that they walk into this environment with liabilities. we think it's completely opposite. >> reporter: once the students move on to college they stay in regular contact with their one goal teacher through their first year. the aim is not just to get kids into college but to equip them with the support system they need to finish. >> we've seen 20, 25 years of education reform in the united states. almost all of it has been directed in prek through 12 which has -- so we see that proliferation of charter schools we've seen early childhood interventions work, we've seen human capital providers, we've seen big city mayors like rahm emanuel take over education yet almost none of it has spread to higher education. so our country has begun to get college access right but we see huge dropout rates in college. >> reporter: cynthia barren is a coac
the obama administration. during his tenure, he invested in a citi fund that was registered in the cayman islands, well known as an offshore tax haven. republicans pressed lew on the issue at his senate confirmation hearing today. >> my benefit was really very small in the sense that i took a loss when i sold the investment. i always reported all income. i always paid any taxes that were due. i very strongly believe that we should have tax policies that make it difficult, if not impossible, to shelter income from taxation. >> sreenivasan: lew is expected to win confirmation in the full senate. that vote could come late this month. the obama administration is now calling for congress to close gaps in the nation's cyber- security. the president signed an executive order on tuesday, increasing government efforts to share information on threats. it also urges voluntary efforts by industry. congress has struggled to reach consensus on the issue due to legal and privacy questions. this was a mixed day on wall street, as stocks searched for direction. the dow jones industrial average lost more t
that are covered, that's all states, municipalities, counties, city governments, in the last ten years there have only been 37 objections. in fact, today chief justice asked the solicitor general in 2005 the year before renewal how many submissions were made of voting changes? 3,700. how many objections were made? just one. the point of that is there is no longer systematic widespread discrimination and the record that congress established did not show that. >> woodruff: sherrilyn? >> that's too narrow a vision of what section 5 does. objections are when the community or jurisdiction proposes a plan, the justice department reviews it and determines that that plan is going to discriminate against minority voters. but there are other things that happen as well. sometimes the jurisdiction submits a plan, the justice department says "we think this plan is problematic, give us more information." and the jurisdiction at that point will decide to withdraw the plan. there are over 800 instances in the period that congress studied in which a jurisdiction did precisely that. >> woodruff: so what about that
, and french troops now have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jorda
in the hills south of the city where in just a few minutes he will take leave of his office. >> brown: a short time ago i talked to john allen near st. peter's square. he's an analyst for cnn and a correspondent for the "national catholic reporter." so,, as we watch the pope fly away today, is his future role as emeritus pope clear? it's a new position, after all. >> it is. what benedict the 16th has told us is he is going to be hidden from the world which means he's not going to be, at least publicly, hearing him, secretary-general him. he's not going to hit the lecture circuit or give interviews. we assume he will see people in private but the vatican won't issue news bulletins about those encounters so for all intense and purposes he's had his swan song on the public stage. that much is clear. what is less clear are two points: one, if he is going to continue to have any sort of behind-the-scenes role of the next pope. whether the next pope will seek his counsel. whether there will be conversation. and secondly how the role of a retired pope will play out in front of the broader court of op
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
't... i wasn't in like this city, in this state, or like even on this earth, so my whole grand scheme, grand plan was like suicide by cop. >> reporter: andy planned a so called suicide by cop, expecting the authorities to gun him down, but he had a change of heart at the last minute dropped the revolver and surrendered. researchers say 60% of rampage shooters are suicidal before the carnage. psychologist john keilp studies suicidal people, trying to find out how their brains differ from others. >> we're looking at what's different about those people. one of the things i think we feel confident about is that there is something different about those people, that it's not just a feature of depression. >> take your three fingers and put it on the buttons and one, two, and three stands for the response red, blue or green. >> reporter: keilp believes one fundamental difference may show up in a deceptively simple test, which he let me try. it is called a stroop test invented by psychologist john ridley stroop in the 1930s. it sounds simple: all i had to do is identify the color i saw in the
rallies, dances and vigils in dozens of major cities. the events were held to coincide with valentine's day. the united nations has estimated that one of every three women worldwide, is raped or beaten in the course of a lifetime. a long-time leader in american a new implantable device that restores some vision in the blind won approval today in the united states. the food and drug administration agreed to allow use of the argus 2 retinal prosthesis. it uses electrodes in the retina that receives signals from a wireless camera on a pair of glasses. initially the device will help small numbers, but it may ultimately treat vision disorders in millions. a long-time leader in american foods-- heinz is being sold to a group that includes warren buffett. the $23.3 billion deal announced today will make heinz a privately held company. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nine points to close at 13,973. the nasdaq rose a point to close at 3,198. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: there were more hurdles today for president obama's se
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)